You’ll miss many things about Thailand and you’ll be missed

Issara Patthamasukhon

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You’ll miss many things about Thailand and you’ll be missed


Did you just enjoy your stay in Thailand and are now leaving the country with a heavy heart? 

Here is a rundown of the 7 things that you, as a visitor to Thailand, will probably miss when you go home, along with the 8th, the reason why you are probably coming back.

The food

Traditional Thai granite mortar and pestle surrounded by organic Thai herbs and plants.

Whatever you eat in Thailand, except desserts, of course, is spicy. Neophytes to Thai food may find it “too hot”, but once you’ve acquired tolerance for that chilli kick, you will have a higher appreciation and regard for the national cuisine.

Thai food is absolutely delicious, which you will realise once you have trained your palate to cope with the spiciness. In the meantime, whether you’re dining in an upscale restaurant or at food stalls in the street, don’t hesitate to ask for your meal to be toned down to suit your taste. 

Visitors come back to Thailand for the authentic dishes they miss so much at a fraction of the price they pay at Thai restaurants in their home countries.

The night markets

View from above of a series of colorful stalls from a Thai night market.

As evening draws in and the temperature drops, Thais head to the night markets, usually just a group of makeshift stalls offering clothes, bags, shoes, accessories and plenty more besides. Wander around and you are sure to find some surprises including mysterious-looking amulets and interesting jewellery.

Transportation

A row of tuk-tuks on the side of the street in Thailand.

Modes of transportation in Thailand are varied and most cities offer a profusion of both modern and traditional transportation. Metropolitan Bangkok has one of the most modern elevated train and subway systems in the world. Railway travel is an experience in itself and air travel is top-notch. 

Meanwhile, along the streets, the mighty tuk-tuk still gets its share of attention. To avoid traffic, boat rides along the canals can be both stress-relieving and thrilling. 

The language

A notebook with the words "Learn Thai" written on it.

The Thai language is very melodic, with varying intonations and nasal variations. But don’t be fooled! It may sound very monosyllabic but, in reality, a slight change in the way the tongue is placed gives an altogether different meaning to a word.

To foreign ears, Thai sounds courteous, friendly, soothing, and most of all, accommodating.

Read More: Learning Thai as a Foreigner, Teacher, Mother

The temples

War Arun (Temple of the Dawn) in Bangkok, Thailand.

Thailand is synonymous with temples and vice versa. And who can resist the sight of these magnificent structures peering out from the rolling hills? They are stunning! Both imposing and majestic, temples bring serenity to the viewer. Going inside is a one-of-a-kind experience – a feeling beyond description!

The beaches

White sandy beaches framed by with limestone karsts.

In nearby Pattaya and the southern provinces, nature lovers enjoy sandy beaches and picture-perfect locations. For a more eclectic sand-and-sea enjoyment, Pattaya and its beaches are a must-visit. For a more esoteric and romantic excursion, Phuket, Krabi and Samui are the places to go.

The festivals and celebrations

People splashing each other with water to celebrate the Songkran festival (Thai New Year).

Thailand has a celebration or reason for merry-making almost every month. The most popular is Songkran, the water festival that marks Thai New Year. It signals the start of summer and is celebrated by splashing people with water. 

Thailand has a celebration or reason for merry-making almost every month. The most popular is Songkran, the water festival that marks Thai New Year. It signals the start of summer and is celebrated by splashing people with water. 

These are the 7 things most visitors miss about Thailand. They are also the reasons why they come back. And the 8th reason?

They come back to rekindle friendships built with the locals. It may be with the Thai noodle vendor, the girl selling handicrafts in the night market, the tuk-tuk driver who took them around, the neighbour who taught them the proper way to wai, the monk in the nearby temple, the girl selling Thai sweets at the beach, or the boy who doused them with water during Songkran. It’s easy to make friends in the Land of Smiles where the locals are amongst the friendliest folk on Earth. 

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Issara Patthamasukhon

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